Foros México  

Regresar   Foros México > Sección Principal > Foro Libre > Se publico en...

Responder
 
Herramientas Estilo
  #1  
Viejo 17-October-2017, 14:20
Avatar de Rafael Norma
Rafael Norma Rafael Norma no ha iniciado sesión
Forista Turquesa
 
Registrado: 18-02-08
Posts: 19,788
Predeterminado El_pan_de_muerto_en_méxico

El PAN DE MUERTO Mexicano
Trump y el Arte de La Solución
Por Por Shannon K. O'Neil
THE_BREAD´S DEATH:








The Mexican Standoff

Trump and the Art of the Workaround
By Shannon K. O'Neil
Listen to Article






For most of the twentieth century, Mexico and the United States were distant neighbors. Obliviousness and neglect from the north was met with resentment and, at times, outright hostility from the south, leaving the two countries diplomatically detached. Yet as the twenty-first century approached, this wariness began to fade, replaced by cooperation and even something resembling friendship. The détente began in the early 1990s, when Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari and U.S. President George H. W. Bush developed a shared economic vision, culminating in the signing of the North American Free Trade Agreement, the largest free-trade agreement in the world and the first to include countries with mature economies (the United States and Canada) and a country with a still emerging economy (Mexico). Bush’s successor, Bill Clinton, embraced the rapprochement, shepherding NAFTA through Congress and later rescuing Mexico from a financial crisis. And although Clinton’s successor, George W. Bush, failed in his attempt at comprehensive immigration reform, he succeeded in working with his Mexican counterparts, Vicente Fox and Felipe Calderón, to transform the U.S.-Mexican security relationship for the better. President Barack Obama reaffirmed and expanded bilateral cooperation by deepening the two countries’ economic integration and supporting Mexico’s efforts to establish the rule of law and improve the security of its citizens.


During the past 25 years, connections between the two countries have proliferated at the state and local levels as well. Governors have set up trade offices and sponsored repeated commercial visits. Law enforcement officers have trained together and conducted joint operations. Universities have initiated cross-border research projects and exchanges. Mayors have embraced sister cities and held joint events and conferences; San Diego and Tijuana even explored a shared bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics.

But that quarter century of partnership is now faltering, thanks to U.S. President Donald Trump’s overt hostility to Mexico and Mexicans. The invective began during Trump’s campaign, during which he called NAFTA “the worst trade deal in history” and claimed that Mexico was “killing us economically.” He attacked Mexican immigrants to the United States, painting them as “criminals” and “rapists” that steal jobs and threaten American lives. He pledged to establish a “deportation force” to rid the nation of millions of “criminal aliens.” And his bellowed promise to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexican border—and force Mexico to pay for it, no less—served as a frequent climax at his rallies, often eliciting the loudest cheers from his supporters.

Since Trump took office, his approach to Mexico has alternated between insincere flattery and in-your-face aggression. Even when talking up his “tremendous relations with” and “love” for Mexico, he has prioritized the border wall, bidding out the project and asking Congress for $1.6 billion to jump-start construction, while still maintaining that Mexico will somehow pay for it, ultimately. (So far, Congress has demurred.) On immigration, Trump has spared the so-called Dreamers—young people, mostly from Mexico, who were brought to the United States illegally when they were children—from his earlier threats to deport them. But he has also ordered the Department of Homeland Security to step up raids in immigrant communities and has lashed out at so-called sanctuary cities, which block their local law enforcement agencies from sharing information about residents’ immigration status with DHS. The Trump administration has also threatened to send anyone caught crossing the southern border illegally back to Mexico—regardless of their actual nationality. And Trump’s hatred of NAFTA has endured, although his threats to pull out of the deal altogether have been replaced by a plan to renegotiate its terms.

Faced with this unprecedented belligerence, Mexico has few options—and even fewer good ones. The best approach would be to avoid confronting Trump—not by capitulating to him but by going around him. To salvage the hard-won gains of the last two and a half decades, Mexico needs to venture outside the Beltway and deepen its already rich connections to U.S. states, municipalities, businesses, civic institutions, and communities. This approach is being pursued (with some early success) by the United States’ neighbor to the north, Canada. And it might work even better for Mexico, which has more grass-roots connections to American society than does Canada.Indignation and anger over Trump’s rise have begun to reshape domestic politics in Mexico.

THINGS GO SOUTH

The about-face in Washington’s approach to Mexico is taking place at a time when Mexico has never been more important to the U.S. economy and to Americans themselves. Mexicoprovides a huge proportion of the vegetables on their tables, the parts in their cars, and the caregivers for their youngest and oldest citizens. NAFTA helped usher in this interdependence, influencing the way that thousands of companies buy, sell, and make things on both sides of the border. Trade in goods between the two countries skyrocketed, from around $135 billion in 1993 to over $520 billion in 2016, adjusting for inflation. Meanwhile, Mexican exporters came to prefer U.S. suppliers over all others, buying, on average, 40 percent of their inputs from the United States, compared with 25 percent from Canada and less than five percent each from Brazil, China, and the EU. Prior to NAFTA, that figure for the United States stood at just five percent. In that sense, U.S. trade with Mexico hasn’t “killed jobs,” as NAFTA’s critics argue; it has instead ramped up sales of U.S. goods south of the border that support some five million U.S.-based jobs.
Meanwhile, immigration has deepened interpersonal bonds between the citizens of the two countries. Some seven million Mexicans settled in the north between 1990 and 2007. That immigration wave has receded in recent years; since 2009, over 140,000 more Mexicans have left the United States than have come to it. But around 11 million still reside in the United States, in addition to nearly 25 million Americans of Mexican heritage. And the movement has gone both ways: over one million U.S. citizens currently make their homes in Mexico, the largest diaspora community of Americans anywhere in the world.


These ever more encompassing ties mean that Trump’s outbursts, threats, and vilification of Mexico have reverberated throughout the country’s economy, society, and politics. Mexican markets have taken the most immediate blow. The peso plummeted following Trump’s victory, falling further than any other emerging-market currency during the first quarter of 2017. Foreign investment also sank as Trump criticized companies, including Carrier and Ford, for moving jobs south of the border (or planning to) and the companies responded by postponing, scaling back, or canceling those plans. Overall foreign direct investment in the country fell by 20 percent in 2016 as Trump marched toward the GOP nomination, with the largest declines concentrated in trade-oriented sectors. After Trump’s victory in the general election, forecasts for Mexico’s 2017 economic performance turned pessimistic.
Citar y responder
  #2  
Viejo 17-October-2017, 15:08
Avatar de Rafael Norma
Rafael Norma Rafael Norma no ha iniciado sesión
Forista Turquesa
 
Registrado: 18-02-08
Posts: 19,788
Thumbs down Re: El_pan_de_muerto_en_méxico

#El_PAN_DE_MUERTO_MexiNaco
Trump y el Arte de La Solución
Por Por Shannon K. O'Neil










Durante la mayor parte del siglo XX, México y los Estados Unidos fueron vecinos lejanos. La indiferencia y la negligencia del norte se encontraron con el resentimiento y, a veces, la hostilidad abierta desde el sur, dejando a los dos países diplomáticamente alejados. Sin embargo, a medida que se acercaba el siglo veintiuno, esta cautela comenzó a desvanecerse, reemplazada por la cooperación e incluso algo parecido a la amistad. La distensión comenzó a principios de los años 90, cuando el presidente de México, Carlos Salinas de Gortari, y el presidente de EE. UU., George HW Bush, desarrollaron una visión económica compartida que culminó con la firma del Tratado de Libre Comercio de América del Norte, el mayor acuerdo de libre comercio en el mundo. primero para incluir países con economías maduras (Estados Unidos y Canadá) y un país con una economía aún emergente (México). El sucesor de Bush, Bill Clinton, aceptó el acercamiento, guiando al TLCAN a través del Congreso y luego rescatando a México de una crisis financiera. Y aunque el sucesor de Clinton, George W. Bush, falló en su intento de reforma migratoria integral, logró trabajar con sus contrapartes mexicanas, Vicente Fox y Felipe Calderón, para transformar la relación de seguridad entre Estados Unidos y México para mejor. El presidente Barack Obama reafirmó y amplió la cooperación bilateral al profundizar la integración económica de los dos países y apoyar los esfuerzos de México para establecer el estado de derecho y mejorar la seguridad de sus ciudadanos.


Durante los últimos 25 años, las conexiones entre los dos países también han proliferado a nivel estatal y local. Los gobernadores han establecido oficinas comerciales y patrocinadas visitas comerciales repetidas. Los funcionarios encargados de hacer cumplir la ley se han formado y realizado operaciones conjuntas. Las universidades han iniciado proyectos e intercambios de investigación transfronterizos. Los alcaldes han abrazado ciudades hermanas y celebrado eventos y conferencias conjuntas; San Diego y Tijuana incluso exploraron una oferta compartida para los Juegos Olímpicos de verano de 2024.


Pero ese cuarto de siglo de asociación ahora está vacilando, gracias a la abierta hostilidad del presidente de los Estados Unidos, Donald Trump, para México y los mexicanos. La invectiva comenzó durante la campaña de Trump, durante la cual calificó al NAFTA como "el peor acuerdo comercial en la historia" y afirmó que México "nos estaba matando económicamente". Atacó a inmigrantes mexicanos a Estados Unidos, pintándolos como "criminales" y "violadores" que roban trabajos y amenazan las vidas estadounidenses. Se comprometió a establecer una "fuerza de deportación" para liberar a la nación de millones de "extranjeros criminales". Y su promesa aulló de construir un muro a lo largo de la frontera entre México y Estados Unidos y forzar a México a pagar, no menos, sirvió como clímax frecuente en sus mítines, a menudo provocando los vítores más fuertes de sus seguidores.


Desde que Trump asumió el cargo, su enfoque en México ha alternado entre la adulación no sincera y la agresión en la cara. Incluso cuando habla de sus "tremendas relaciones con" y "amor" para México, ha priorizado el muro fronterizo, presentando el proyecto y pidiéndole al Congreso $ 1.6 mil millones para comenzar la construcción, al tiempo que mantiene que México de alguna manera lo pagará , por último. (Hasta ahora, el Congreso ha criticado). Sobre la inmigración, Trump ha salvado a los llamados Dreamers -jóvenes, en su mayoría de México, que fueron traídos ilegalmente a Estados Unidos cuando eran niños- de sus amenazas anteriores de deportarlos. Pero también ordenó al Departamento de Seguridad Nacional intensificar las incursiones en las comunidades de inmigrantes y arremetió contra las llamadas ciudades santuario, que impiden que sus agencias locales encargadas de hacer cumplir la ley compartan información sobre el estado migratorio de los residentes con el DHS. El gobierno de Trump también ha amenazado con enviar ilegalmente a México a cualquiera que sea atrapado cruzando la frontera sur, independientemente de su nacionalidad real. Y el odio de Trump por el TLCAN ha perdurado, aunque sus amenazas de retirarse completamente han sido reemplazadas por un plan para renegociar sus términos.
Frente a esta beligerancia sin precedentes, México tiene pocas opciones, e incluso menos buenas. El mejor enfoque sería evitar enfrentarse con Trump, no capitulándolo, sino andando a su alrededor. Para salvar los logros ganados con esfuerzo durante las últimas dos décadas y media, México necesita aventurarse fuera de Beltway y profundizar sus ya ricas conexiones con los estados, municipios, empresas, instituciones cívicas y comunidades de Estados Unidos. Este enfoque se está llevando a cabo (con cierto éxito inicial) por el vecino de los Estados Unidos en el norte, Canadá. Y podría funcionar aún mejor para México, que tiene más conexiones de base con la sociedad estadounidense que Canadá. La indignación y la ira por el ascenso de Trump han comenzado a reformar la política interna en México.


LAS COSAS VAN AL SUR

El cambio radical en el enfoque de Washington hacia México se produce en un momento en que México nunca ha sido más importante para la economía estadounidense y para los propios estadounidenses. Mexicoproporciona una gran proporción de los vegetales en sus mesas, las partes en sus autos y los cuidadores para sus ciudadanos más jóvenes y mayores. El TLCAN ayudó a iniciar esta interdependencia, influyendo en la forma en que miles de empresas compran, venden y fabrican cosas en ambos lados de la frontera. El comercio de bienes entre los dos países se disparó, de alrededor de $ 135 mil millones en 1993 a más de $ 520 mil millones en 2016, ajustándose a la inflación. Mientras tanto, los exportadores mexicanos llegaron a preferir a los proveedores estadounidenses por encima de todos los demás, comprando, en promedio, el 40 por ciento de sus insumos de los Estados Unidos, en comparación con el 25 por ciento de Canadá y menos del cinco por ciento de Brasil, China y la UE. Antes del NAFTA, esa cifra para los Estados Unidos era de solo cinco por ciento. En ese sentido, el comercio de EE. UU. Con México no ha "matado trabajos", como argumentan los críticos del TLCAN; en cambio, ha incrementado las ventas de bienes de los Estados Unidos al sur de la frontera que dan soporte a unos cinco millones de empleos basados en Estados Unidos.


Mientras tanto, la inmigración ha profundizado los lazos interpersonales entre los ciudadanos de los dos países. Alrededor de siete millones de mexicanos se establecieron en el norte entre 1990 y 2007. Esa ola de inmigración ha retrocedido en los últimos años; desde 2009, más de 140,000 más mexicanos han salido de los Estados Unidos de lo que han venido. Pero alrededor de 11 millones aún residen en los Estados Unidos, además de casi 25 millones de estadounidenses de herencia mexicana. Y el movimiento ha ido en dos sentidos: más de un millón de ciudadanos de los Estados Unidos actualmente viven en México, la mayor comunidad de estadounidenses de la diáspora en cualquier parte del mundo.

Editado por Rafael Norma en 17-October-2017 a las 15:11
Citar y responder
  #3  
Viejo 17-October-2017, 15:21
Avatar de Rafael Norma
Rafael Norma Rafael Norma no ha iniciado sesión
Forista Turquesa
 
Registrado: 18-02-08
Posts: 19,788
Predeterminado Re: El_pan_de_muerto_en_méxico

Continua...

Estas relaciones cada vez más abarcativas significan que los arrebatos, las amenazas y la difamación de México por Trump han repercutido en toda la economía, la sociedad y la política del país. Los mercados mexicanos han recibido el golpe más inmediato. El peso se desplomó tras la victoria de Trump, cayendo más que cualquier otra moneda de los mercados emergentes durante el primer trimestre de 2017. La inversión extranjera también se hundió cuando Trump criticó a las compañías, incluidas Carrier y Ford, por trasladar empleos al sur de la frontera (o planificar) y las empresas respondieron posponiendo, reduciendo o cancelando esos planes. En general, la inversión extranjera directa en el país cayó un 20 por ciento en 2016 a medida que Trump avanzaba hacia la nominación del Partido Republicano, y las mayores disminuciones se concentraban en los sectores orientados al comercio. Después de la victoria de Trump en las elecciones generales, las previsiones para el desempeño económico de México en 2017 se volvieron pesimistas.


Recientemente, esas pérdidas han disminuido: una vez que la percepción de amenaza al TLCAN pasó en abril, el peso se recuperó y la inversión extranjera directa comenzó a fluir nuevamente. Sin embargo, el futuro del TLCAN sigue siendo incierto. Y las propuestas del Congreso de los EE. UU. Para crear un nuevo impuesto de ajuste fronterizo (que se aplicará a las importaciones de México y otros lugares) y reducir drásticamente las tasas impositivas corporativas de los Estados Unidos amenazarían la competitividad y el modelo económico basado en las exportaciones de México.

REUTERS La gente marcha para celebrar el 102 aniversario de la Revolución Mexicana en la Ciudad de México, noviembre de 2012.


HAGA A MÉXICO GRANDE OTRA VEZ


Mientras tanto, las actitudes de los mexicanos hacia su poderoso vecino también han cambiado rápidamente; Estados Unidos ha pasado de parangón a paria. La ira del público se ha reflejado en la proliferación de piñatas y luchadores inspirados en el triunfo (luchadores profesionales disfrazados). Las encuestas muestran que el número de mexicanos con puntos de vista negativos de los Estados Unidos se ha triplicado desde las elecciones; En general, los mexicanos ahora se sienten más cálidos hacia Rusia y Venezuela que hacia los Estados Unidos. En una reciente encuesta de Pew, México ocupó el último lugar entre las 37 naciones en términos de confianza pública en Trump.


No solo hay menos mexicanos inmigrando a los Estados Unidos en estos días, pero incluso los turistas están en baja. De acuerdo con la firma mundial de investigación Tourism Economics, casi dos millones de mexicanos están planeando tomar vacaciones estadounidenses de lo que planearon al mismo tiempo el año pasado, y la cantidad de mexicanos que solicitaron inscribirse en escuelas en el sistema de la Universidad de California este otoño cayó más de un tercio en comparación con el año pasado.


Por supuesto, casi uno de cada diez ciudadanos mexicanos ya vive en los Estados Unidos, y el ascenso de Trump ha cobrado un precio terrible en muchos de ellos. Las familias de estado migratorio mixto, recientemente temerosas de los agentes federales, han sacado a sus hijos de la escuela, cancelado las citas médicas y dejado de ir a restaurantes locales, tiendas de abarrotes y eventos en el vecindario. Este autoaislamiento está vaciándose una vez que las comunidades son vibrantes y ha dañado las economías de muchas ciudades de Estados Unidos en dificultades.


La indignación y la ira por el ascenso de Trump han comenzado a reformar la política interna en México, provocando corrientes nacionalistas y aislacionistas que duraron mucho tiempo. Los mexicanos en todo el espectro político se quedaron atónitos e indignados cuando el presidente mexicano, Enrique Peña Nieto, invitó a Trump a reunirse con él en la Ciudad de México en agosto de 2016, lo que desató una caída catastrófica en las calificaciones de aprobación de Peña Nieto, de las cuales aún no se ha recuperado; En julio, solo el 17 por ciento de los mexicanos aprobó su desempeño. Mientras México mira hacia las elecciones nacionales y presidenciales en 2018, Trump ha vuelto a ser políticamente rentable para los políticos mexicanos enfrentarse a Estados Unidos. Hoy, los senadores mexicanos exhiben pancartas en contra de Trump en su cámara y producen numerosas represalias y antinorteamericanos. El ascenso de Trump también ha alentado a los proteccionistas mexicanos, quienes están ansiosos por volver atrás a la era anterior al TLCAN y recuperar las ganancias que obtuvieron cuando la competencia económica fue más limitada. Los productores de aluminio, acero, cemento, vidrio y muchos otros materiales y bienes podrían argumentar que si Washington puede favorecer a las empresas de EE. UU. Por las extranjeras en algunas industrias, entonces el gobierno mexicano debería hacer lo mismo con las empresas mexicanas.


El principal beneficiario político de estas tendencias ha sido el populista de izquierda Andrés Manuel López Obrador, que planea postularse para la presidencia por tercera vez el próximo año. El día después de la victoria de Trump, López Obrador fue filmado frente a un mural por el célebre pintor mexicano Diego Rivera, asegurando a los mexicanos que México seguirá siendo una nación libre e independiente" - "no es una colonia" y "no depende de ningún gobierno extranjero". "(Peña Nieto limitó su propia respuesta a un tuit felicitando a Trump). Las calificaciones de aprobación de López Obrador se dispararon, del 11 por ciento en septiembre de 2016 al 24 por ciento en noviembre. En los últimos meses, ha fusionado este llamamiento a la soberanía mexicana en su plataforma anti-establecimiento más amplia. Ahora es considerado el favorito en la carrera presidencial del próximo año.

Mientras otros aspirantes anuncian sus intenciones, ellos, también, sin duda, prometen una mano más firme con el matón al norte. Los mexicanos elegirán no solo al presidente, sino también a más de 3.000 otros funcionarios el próximo julio, lo que plantea la posibilidad de que los nacionalistas puedan tomar el poder en todos los niveles del gobierno de México.

Editado por Rafael Norma en 17-October-2017 a las 15:23
Citar y responder
  #4  
Viejo 17-October-2017, 15:27
Avatar de Rafael Norma
Rafael Norma Rafael Norma no ha iniciado sesión
Forista Turquesa
 
Registrado: 18-02-08
Posts: 19,788
Predeterminado Re: El_pan_de_muerto_en_méxico

HACIENDO NUEVOS AMIGOS


Mientras tanto, el gobierno de Peña Nieto ha luchado para responder efectivamente a Trump y sus provocaciones. Inicialmente se basó en la relación personal que el yerno y consejero de Trump, Jared Kushner, y Luis Videgaray, ahora ministro de Relaciones Exteriores de México, habían construido mientras negociaban la visita del candidato Trump a México en agosto de 2016. Pero las autoridades mexicanas se mostraron ciegas cuando, cinco días antes de una reunión programada de uno a uno entre los dos presidentes en enero, Trump se dirigió a Twitter para declarar que Peña Nieto no debería venir a Washington a menos que aceptara pagar el muro fronterizo. Peña Nieto, humillado, canceló el viaje.


Desde esa debacle, el gobierno mexicano ha recalibrado su enfoque. Sin renunciar por completo a la posibilidad de ganar a los asesores de la Casa Blanca y miembros del gabinete de Trump, se ha centrado en llegar a otros posibles aliados. Estos incluyen a los gobernadores y otros funcionarios electos en los 23 estados de los Estados Unidos para quienes México es su mayor o segundo mercado de exportación, los cientos de miles de agricultores estadounidenses que venden más de $ 18 mil millones en bienes a México cada año, exportadores estadounidenses de gran tamaño que tengan mayor probabilidad de enviar sus mercancías a México que en cualquier otro lugar del mundo y grandes multinacionales que atienden a consumidores mexicanos. Con la ayuda de 50 oficinas consulares en los Estados Unidos y la asistencia de las élites empresariales mexicanas, el gobierno de Peña Nieto ha comenzado a trabajar en el sistema de Estados Unidos, cortejando a todos los niveles de gobierno y buscando posibles aliados de raíces de pastizales.


Este juego de tierra se encuentra en sus etapas iniciales y es más limitado y ad hoc que el emprendido por el otro vecino de Estados Unidos, Canadá. Sin embargo, ya está mostrando algunos signos de promesa. Un grupo bipartidista de senadores estadounidenses, incluidos los pesos pesados republicanos John Cornyn de Texas, John McCain de Arizona, y Marco Rubio de Florida y los demócratas Ben Cardin de Maryland, ~~~~ Durbin de Illinois, y Bob Menendez de Nueva Jersey, han presentado una resolución que reafirma la importancia de la cooperación bilateral en un esfuerzo por proteger el progreso logrado en las relaciones entre Estados Unidos y México en los últimos 25 años. Los miembros de la Cámara de Representantes y los gobernadores y alcaldes de los Estados Unidos en los Estados Unidos también están despertando la importancia de México para sus electores y hablando en apoyo de la relación. Dentro de la comunidad empresarial de los EE. UU., Los ejecutivos principales como Jeff Immelt de GE y Mark Zuckerberg de Facebook han condenado el ataque de Trump a México y los inmigrantes. Mientras tanto, la Cámara de Comercio de EE. UU. Y otras asociaciones han apoyado y han estado haciendo lobby de dólares detrás de la defensa del TLCAN. El enfoque de Trump a México ha alternado entre la adulación no sincera y la agresión en la cara.

Pero México también está apostando por un Plan B. Permanece comprometido con la Asociación Transpacífica y, en mayo y julio, envió enviados comerciales para reunirse con representantes de los otros diez países firmantes restantes para avanzar con el acuerdo comercial a pesar del rechazo de Trump. México también mantiene conversaciones con la UE para actualizar y modernizar un acuerdo de libre comercio que ambas partes hicieron en el año 2000. Y está trabajando para expandir sus lazos comerciales con Argentina, Brasil, China y países del Medio Oriente. Si bien Estados Unidos seguirá siendo el mercado más grande de México, tales movimientos pueden fortalecer la mano negociadora de los mexicanos con Washington y proporcionar algunos seguros en caso de que la relación se deteriore aún más.


ALREDEDOR DE TRUMP


Hasta el momento, el objetivo principal de México ha sido simplemente proteger el estado actual de pre-Trump tanto como sea posible. Sin embargo, con la relación entre Estados Unidos y México en constante cambio, ahora hay una oportunidad para pensar grande y fundamentalmente reformar el futuro de América del Norte.

Hacer un progreso real obligaría a los estadounidenses a abandonar sus fantasías de aislarse de México y requeriría que los mexicanos pasen su indignación por Trump e ignoren la canción de sirena del nacionalismo. Solo entonces un nuevo acuerdo económico entre México y los Estados Unidos podría ir más allá de simplemente mezclarse con el TLCAN y crear una frontera más innovadora y que funcione mejor que acelere el flujo de bienes, servicios, ideas y personas. Solo entonces, los dos países podrían enfrentar juntos las amenazas comunes de tráfico de drogas, crimen organizado, terrorismo, desastres naturales, epidemias de salud y ataques cibernéticos. Solo entonces podrían invertir en las fuerzas de trabajo que abarcan la frontera. Y solo entonces podrían ampliar sus intercambios educativos, capacitación vocacional y certificación para trabajadores norteamericanos y establecer reglas de inmigración que reconozcan que un movimiento más libre fortalece a las familias, las comunidades y las economías que dependen cada vez más de las cadenas de suministro y las cadenas de suministro transfronterizas.


Por supuesto, esa visión es un anatema para muchos de los partidarios centrales de Trump y se siente incómodo con el proteccionismo "AMERICA PRIMERO" de Trump. Excepto México
Citar y responder
Responder

Herramientas
Estilo

Reglas del foro
Usted no puede comenzar discusiones
Usted no puede enviar respuestas
Usted no puede enviar archivos adjuntos
Usted no puede editar sus mensajes

el código BB está activado
Emotícones está activado
El código [IMG] está activado
El código HTML está activado

Ir a


Todas las horas son GMT -5. La hora es 21:45.


Foros México
Page generated in 0.34502 seconds with 9 queries